ACE Report on Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs), Predominately Black Institutions (PBIs), and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) indicate Upward Mobility.

by Carjamin Scott on June 21, 2018, at 5:03 p.m. CST

According to a report published by the American Council on Education’s Center for Policy Research and Strategy, students enrolled at four-year Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) go from the lowest income quintile to the top income quintile at a higher rate than four-year non minority serving institutions. The same is true for students enrolled at Predominately Black Institutions (PBIs) and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

Minority serving institutions (MSIs) are credited for educating students of color from families with low economic resources and educational attainment at a higher rate than non-MSIs, even while financially disadvantaged.

Minority serving institutions (MSIs) are credited for educating students of color from families with low economic resources and educational attainment at a higher rate than non-MSIs. The report further concludes that, MSIs are “engines of upward mobility for millions of students, and play this role even while the majority of MSIs are at a financial disadvantage when compared to non-MSIs.” Here are some facts from the report.

Four-Year Institutions with Low Expenditures

  • 20% of students enrolled at four-year HSIs and 25% of students enrolled at PBIs and HBCUs were from families in the lowest income quintile—more than three times that of non-MSIs.
  • Four-year HSIs, in particular, had an upward income mobility rate three times that of non-MSIs (4.3 percent compared to 1.5 percent).
  • Four-year HSIs, PBIs, and HBCUs had an upward income mobility rate double that of non-MSIs (approximately 20 percent compared to 9 percent).
  • 20% of low-income students are enrolled at HSIs and 25% of low-income students are enrolled at PBIs. Only 8% of low-income students are enrolled at four-year non-MSIs.

Two-Year Institutions

  • Around 30% of students at PBIs and HBCUs  (29% and 33%, respectively) from the lowest income quintile are enrolled at a rate double that of non-MSIs at 15%.
  • 3.2% is the upward income rate of students enrolled at two-year MSIs which is double that of non-MSIs at 1.5%.
  • 17.2% is the extended upward income mobility rate for HSIs.
  • 13% is the extended upward income mobility rate of PBIs and HBCUs.

The value of minority-serving institutions is undeniable. Here are some ways that we can continue to support the work of these institutions.

  1. Vote for policymakers that value post-secondary success for all students and are funding them.
  2. If you are an alum of an MSI, participate in alumni-related events, mentor current students, and give money.
  3. Attend MSI events, send your children to MSIs, and help change the narrative of these institutions.

Request to publish or suggest a correction here.

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Carjamin Scott can be reached at carjamin.scott@gmail.com and you can follow her on twitter @scottcarjie.

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