Category: Education

Join me for the #300wishlist challenge inspired by Steve Harvey

by Carjamin Scott on September 26, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. CST

For the past several months, I have intensely focused on improving my mental, emotional, and spiritual health. Instead of relying on my phone calendar, I bought a paper planner to write down the things that I want to do for myself. I renewed my gym membership. I have been listening to chakra and meditation music. I have been attending bible study. And, I try to ride my bike at least three times a week. I’ve decluttered my social media and I only like or comment on things that speak to my new normal.

The social media algorithm working to collect this data is amazing, and not by accident, my Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter feeds have realigned to support me on this journey. This is how I found “Write Your Vision, Motivated” by Steve Harvey. Isn’t it great when you hear things at the right time and they seem to remind you that you are doing the right thing?

In it, Steve shares two scriptures (James 4:2-3 and Habakuk 2:2) that helped to change the course of his life.

James 4:2-3 You have not because you ask not.

Habakuk 2:2 Write your vision make it plain. 

Then, Steve challenges the audience to meditate on the things we want from God and he gives guidance on how to imagine these things coming to fruition.

300 Wishlist Challenge

Here are the instructions for the 300 Wishlist Challenge

  1. Write down everything you want.
  2. Write at least 300 things. At 75, you might get stuck so begin to ask yourself a few questions.
    1. How many cars do you want?
    2. What kind of car?
    3. What color?
    4. Where do you want your next house to be?
    5. Do you want a summer home?
    6. Where do you want to travel to?
    7. How much money do you want in the bank?
    8. How much would you like to have when you retire?
    9. How much would you like to give your siblings?
  3. Read your list every night and every morning.

Visible Vision Board

Here are the instructions for Visible Vision Board:

  1. Take a photo of your vision board, this is your signal to God of what you want Him to do for you.
  2. Save the photo as your phone and computer screen saver to make your vision board visible and easily accessible.

Today, I am asking you to join me for Steve Harvey’s #300wishlist challenge. Grab a notebook and write down everything you are asking God for. Try to get your list done by the New Year, then let’s check in with each other to see what we’ve marked off our list.

You are Accepted: How to Get Accepted into College and Life

Carjie Scott provides a first-hand account of her experience as an administrator serving at trade schools, graduate institutions, and HBCUs. You are Accepted, is required reading for first-generation college students and higher education professionals. It encourages readers to own their story and accept themselves so that they can transform education for individuals who were historically excluded from attending college.

Enter code “Bulk15” to receive 70% off of your order of 5 or more autographed books.

LinkedIn Tips for Newbies

by Carjamin Scott on December 23, 2018 at 7:11 a.m. CST

LinkedIn is a social media website that individuals use to showcase their work experience and network with industry professionals. Recruiters use LinkedIn to find top talent and fill job openings. 

If you don’t have a LinkedIn profile and are interested in furthering your career, chances are you could be missing out on opportunities to get noticed by employers. Use these tips to get started.

Introduction

Like the name implies, the intro section is the first thing individuals see on LinkedIn. Here is how to use this section to give a great first impression.

  1. Profile Photo – Your profile photo should be a professional business headshot. Since this is a business professional site, you should not use group photos, photos of objects, or any sort of distorted selfie images.
  2. Headline – Picture your headline as, “I am great at this, this, and that”. Or these are the best three adjectives to describe my career title. Or this is my title currently. Basically, your headline is a short statement or phrase with a few adjectives to describe your work interests and abilities. While you are considering ideas, it is fine to simply use your current work title as your headline.
  3. Location – You should include your current or targeted location in your profile so that recruiters are able to determine where you are. 
  4. About – Your about summary can be written in a number of ways. The main objective is to tell a story about your career profession and goals. 

Articles, Posts, Activities, and Interests 

Most people don’t realize the value of the articles, posts, activities, and interests sections; however, when utilized strategically, each can help you get noticed on LinkedIn.

  1. Articles – Consider writing an article and publish your knowledge on LinkedIn. This is a great way to engage with your network and showcase your subject matter expertise. 
  2. Posts – You can repost articles on LinkedIn. When reposting, you should provide a short summary of the article to entice your followers to read what you’ve reposted. 
  3. Activities – Every article or post you comment, like, or repost lands in the activities section of your LinkedIn profile. Be strategic about the content you engage with on your page. Recruiters and your current company can see what content you are engaging with. Try to avoid engaging in any activity (ie. far reaching politics, controversial topics,) that could jeopardize your ability for promotion or a new opportunity. 
  4. Interests – The companies, groups, and schools that you follow or belong to land on the interest page of your LinkedIn profile. You should join and follow organizations that reflect your interests and affiliations.

Background

The background section should detail your work experience, education level, and volunteering accomplishments. Recruiters will use this section to determine if your skills align with their job openings.

  1. Experience – The experience section on your LinkedIn page is probably the most important section to complete if you want to sell yourself to employers. In this section you want to include the name of your company, your employee title, length of experience, and a job description. The job description section can be completed in many ways. Some examples I’ve seen have included bullet points of accomplishments or a short summary. It’s important to use keywords that employers are searching for no matter which method you choose when completing the job description section. 
  2. Education – The education section on your LinkedIn page should include schools attended, length of each program, activities while enrolled, and a description. For recent graduates with no work experience this section is essential to showcase what you’ve done during your education career. Uploading media such as presentations and grades are helpful to employers interested in learning more about your accomplishments while enrolled in school. 
  3. Volunteering – The volunteering section on your LinkedIn page is useful for employers to learn about the organizations that you are invested in. List your role, mission, length involved, and a description of the organization you are involved in. 

Use these tips to get started on your LinkedIn profile. Contact me to present these tips and more. 

Request to publish or suggest a correction here.

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Carjamin Scott can be reached at carjamin.scott@gmail.com and you can follow her on twitter @scottcarjie.

DSBC: Becoming Michelle Obama Recap #1

by Carjamin Scott on December 20, 2018 at 7:11 a.m. CST

Our first Book Club meeting was hosted on December 16, 2018 at 2p. Guests were greeted and offered snacks – popcorn, meat and cheese tray, macaroons, water, and wine. There were nine attendees – two men, seven women, and two married couples. The age range, work experiences, and education levels of the room varied which provided increased depth for our conversation.

To start, we surveyed the room to determine what we hoped to gain from the discussion. We learned that most of the attendees had read the first few pages of the book. Some of the attendees joined the club because of their admiration for Michelle Obama. One attendee mentioned that she saw parallels between her life and Barack Obama’s life. Other attendees just wanted to read the book alongside friends.

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Overall, everyone participated because our conversation was about how our personal stories compared with the Obama’s. We discussed Mrs. Obama’s parents versus our parents or our parenting style, Mrs. Obama’s community versus our neighborhood that we grew up in, and Mrs. Obama’s mention that she is a “box checker” whereas her husband is a “swerver.”

We ended at 4:15p and after the discussion we agreed to read the first section of the book, Becoming Me. It’s about 100 pages. We will meet again on January 13 at 2p at the same location. The location address will be emailed prior to the event. All are welcome to attend. Some of the questions that we may use to guide our next discussion are here.

If you are not on the book club mailing list, please join here.

Request to publish or suggest a correction here.

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Carjamin Scott can be reached at carjamin.scott@gmail.com and you can follow her on twitter @scottcarjie.

DSBC: Becoming Michelle Obama Book Club Discussion Questions

by Carjamin Scott on December 7, 2018 at 5:11 p.m. CST

Good afternoon friends,

I’m so excited about our inaugural book club meeting to discuss Becoming Michelle Obama. The discussion is scheduled for Sunday, December 16 at 2p at the home of Rosetta Miller-Perry, Owner and Chief Publisher of The Tennessee Tribune.

If you have completed the RSVP, the book club meeting address was sent to your email account. If not, there is still time to RSVP and you may do so at this link.

Below are the questions that we will use to guide our discussion.

Introduction:

To begin, please introduce yourself and select a character from the book that you feel most impacted Mrs. Obama’s #iambecoming journey and discuss why.

Discussion Questions:

1) In discussing her neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago, Mrs. Obama writes, “Failure is a feeling long before it becomes an actual result. It’s vulnerability that breeds with self-doubt and then is escalated, often deliberately, by fear.” How did this insight shape Mrs. Obama’s work and mission as First Lady? What can we all do—as individuals, parents, and community members—to help break this cycle?”

2) Early in her senior year at Whitney Young High School, Mrs. Obama went for an obligatory first appointment with the school college counselor. Mrs. Obama was treasurer of the senior class. She had earned a spot in the National Honor Society. She was on track to graduate in the top 10 percent of her class and she was interested in joining her older brother, Craig, at Princeton University. The guidance counselor said to her, “I’m not sure that you’re Princeton material.” How did Mrs. Obama handle hearing that statement? How does one avoid having one’s dreams dislodged by someone else’s lower expectations?

3) In her early life Mrs. Obama writes about being a “box checker,” but as she gets older she learns how to “swerve” to adjust to life’s circumstances. What does it mean to swerve and how do we develop that skill in life?

4) In Becoming, Mrs. Obama describes a number of women who have served as mentors for her at different times in her life, including Czerny Brasuell, Valerie Jarrett, and Susan Sher. What do these women have in common? What lessons did Mrs. Obama learn from them about finding a fulfilling career as a parent? Who are your mentors and how do you cultivate those relationships?

5) As a young professional, Mrs. Obama seemingly had it all—a great job, a great wardrobe, and a clear path to great things in a top-notch Chicago law firm. But she writes, “In my blinding drive to excel, in my need to do things perfectly, I’d missed the signs and taken the wrong road.” She decides to change careers to focus on public service—a move that surprises some who were close to her. What is the value of listening to that little voice that suggests you might be on the wrong path even though the world thinks you are doing exactly the right thing? How do you support someone who decides to follow their own path or create a new one?

6) In Chapter 15, Mrs. Obama explains why she chose to support her husband’s run for the presidency despite her misgivings about politics. What made her change her mind? Would you have made the same choice? How do you balance the competing worlds of family life and work in your life?

7) Life on the campaign trail was a constant education for Mrs. Obama. Among the lessons was the power in people coming together to see her and to see each other eye to eye. “I’ve learned that it’s harder to hate up close.” How do we create spaces where people can come together to talk, listen, and share stories and ideals to build stronger communities, even when people might not agree or share the same history or perspective? How do we as a nation push back against cynicism and the “us vs. them” battles that so often divide us?

8) Mrs. Obama has surrounded herself with a strong and supportive circle of friends from an early age. In some cases the circle was within reach; as she got older and busier, she had to work harder to create and maintain her circle of support. She writes “Friendships between women, as any woman will tell you, are built of a thousand small kindnesses . . . swapped back and forth and over again.” How did she create the building blocks of strong friendships in her life? What is the value in creating and maintaining a circle of strength?

9) Why do you think Michelle Obama chose to name her memoir Becoming? What does the idea of “becoming” mean to you?

I am so excited about our discussion. I can’t wait to see you there! Feel free to bring your favorite champagne, wine, or beverage as we toast to the beginning of something greater for our lives, fellowship with each other, and create community.

These questions are from the official Michelle Obama Becoming Book Guide.

Request to publish or suggest a correction here.

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Carjamin Scott can be reached at carjamin.scott@gmail.com and you can follow her on twitter @scottcarjie.