Category: Humans

Homeless Man Votes For The First Time During The 2019 Midterm Elections

by Carjamin Scott on August 6, 2019 at 9:30 p.m. CST

Roosevelt voted for Gicola Lane, a Nashville Metro Council at-large candidate. Lane shared that this was Roosevelt’s first time voting, he didn’t even vote for Obama! Although Lane did not win, I hope that both first timers remain actively engaged in the process. I hope Roosevelt is able to improve his situation and Lane will continue to fight for a Nashville that represents all of us rather than a few.

Politicians win because they serve the people who vote for them. Johnnie Turner once said, “Politics and politicians control every aspect of our lives.” Let that marinate for a moment. You might say, duh, I know that. But let’s truly marinate on this. Again, politicians win because they serve the people who vote for them. So, which politicians are serving the Roosevelts of our community?

Most of us are not members of the upper class and the Pew research center reports, “since 2016, income disparity between the classes has grown.” At one time, I blamed myself for what I lacked, like most working class and poor people do. I thought that maybe I needed more education, maybe I needed to work harder, maybe I needed to leave my community behind and befriend only people who appeared to have more than me. I figured that lack of money was bad and it was my fault that I did not have any. The last thing I was concerned about was midterm elections.

Midterm elections? Really? Why would a policy maker care about me? Why would I waste my gas money to go to a voting booth? Why would I give away my time to stand in line at the polls? And what 18 year old, would dare ask their boss for time off to go vote? I had no idea that voting was my right and that I should request time off to honor my civic duty.

Plus, I hate to admit this; but, I didn’t know who was truly responsible for securing my neighborhood. And even if I did, I never thought that the person would care about what I thought about their leadership or lack thereof.

However, I’ve grown from my limited thinking and learned that I need to educate the people who come from the community I’m from. It’s our responsibility to hold our leaders accountable and tell them what we need.

I am no Roosevelt and I do not know his story. But what I do know is, we need to stop blaming poor people for being poor. We need to work together to restore hope to our poor and marginalized communities. These voiceless communities need our help more than others. We need to collectively vote for politicians that exhibit high moral character, integrity, and opportunity for all. No matter your socioeconomic class, it’s all of our responsibility.

Photo Credit: Gicola Lane here

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Carjamin Scott can be reached at carjamin.scott@gmail.com and you can follow her on twitter @scottcarjie, instagram @carjiescott, and facebook at Dr. Carjie Scott.

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xoNecole: 4 Women on How Mentorship Changed Their Lives.

Mentorship matters. In The Impact of Being a Mentor, by Brittney Oliver founder of Lemons to Lemonade, four women discussed how mentorship has influenced their lives. Each answered four questions:

  1. How is mentorship important to you?
  2. When and why did you first become a mentor?
  3. What has been the biggest reward of mentoring?
  4. How has mentoring changed your life?

On how mentoring changes lives, below are the responses.

Manessa Lormejuste

Mentoring has changed my life as I have been able to connect with many young women who would not have known about a career such as mine. Mentoring has also allowed me to be more confident in myself and stick true to my beliefs. As I continue to pour into my mentees based on my own experiences, I realize that the life I have chosen to pursue was not a mistake, but what I was destined to do.

Manessa Lormejuste, Cosmetic Chemist at L’Oreal USA
Nekasha Pratt

I am a better person and leader because I’m a mentor. My listening and communication skills have improved, and my patience and empathy have increased. I enjoy helping others achieve their goals, so I also have an increased sense of personal pride from seeing a person I mentored succeed.

Nekasha Pratt, Director of Marketing, Tennessee Department of Tourist Development
Carjie Scott

Mentoring has made me a better person, and I think it has made others better. It has increased my relationships with others and allowed me the chance to encourage others to do their very best. It makes me live a purpose-driven life because I know that people are looking up to me. I understand that I can’t give the shirt off my back if I don’t have a shirt on. So, it makes me take care of myself, so I can care for others.

Carjie Scott, Higher Education Administrator
Crystle Johnson

Mentoring has given me a sense of purpose and accomplishment. We don’t have to fly to the moon or cure cancer to be extraordinary. Through empowering, supporting, and sharing with those who need it — we are extraordinary.

Crystle Johnson, Sr. Consultant, Inclusion, Diversity & CSR at Electronic Arts

Read the full article, courtesy of xoNecole, here.

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Carjamin Scott can be reached at carjamin.scott@gmail.com and you can follow her on twitter @scottcarjie, instagram @carjiescott, and facebook at Dr. Carjie Scott.

The Truth about Voter Suppression Bill #HB1079 and #SB971

by Carjamin Scott on April 19, 2019 at 10:05 p.m. CST

Tennessee has made national headlines for passing a bill in the state House last Monday that penalizes activist groups for submitting voter registration forms that have unintentional errors. Groups such as The Equity Alliance, the TN Black Voter Project, and the Memphis branch of the NAACP believe that this bill is retaliation for registering a record number of black and brown voters. Since 2016, 20 groups across the state organized in urban and rural areas, to register 90,000 new voters, most of these new voters are from poor and minority communities.

Link to article here.

Last October, the TN Black Voter Project and the Memphis branch of the NAACP filed a lawsuit against the Shelby County election commission. The commission rejected 10,000 voter applications from the TNBVP. The lawsuit requested that the election commission “adopt and implement procedures to ensure that eligible voters who submitted timely but incomplete or deficient registration forms can cure any deficiencies” and immediately afterward vote using a regular ballot. TNVBP won the lawsuit and the Shelby County Election Commission had to send letters to the registrants with errors on their forms and extend the voter registration deadline so that those errors could be fixed.

Link to article here.

Now, Secretary of State, Tre Hargett has introduced a voter suppression bill HB1079 and SB971 to combat activist groups that submit incomplete forms. Charlane Oliver, Co-Founder of The Equity Alliance says, ” The entire state is being punished with the most aggressive fines and penalties for doing voter registration drives. You must question the timing of this law and by their own admission is in result of forms they got from the TN Black Voter Project. Their motives for the law is driven by a fear of more people of color voting in elections.”

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Carjamin Scott can be reached at carjamin.scott@gmail.com and you can follow her on twitter @scottcarjie.