Join me for the #300wishlist challenge inspired by Steve Harvey

by Carjamin Scott on September 26, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. CST

For the past several months, I have intensely focused on improving my mental, emotional, and spiritual health. Instead of relying on my phone calendar, I bought a paper planner to write down the things that I want to do for myself. I renewed my gym membership. I have been listening to chakra and meditation music. I have been attending bible study. And, I try to ride my bike at least three times a week. I’ve decluttered my social media and I only like or comment on things that speak to my new normal.

The social media algorithm working to collect this data is amazing, and not by accident, my Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter feeds have realigned to support me on this journey. This is how I found “Write Your Vision, Motivated” by Steve Harvey. Isn’t it great when you hear things at the right time and they seem to remind you that you are doing the right thing?

In it, Steve shares two scriptures (James 4:2-3 and Habakuk 2:2) that helped to change the course of his life.

James 4:2-3 You have not because you ask not.

Habakuk 2:2 Write your vision make it plain. 

Then, Steve challenges the audience to meditate on the things we want from God and he gives guidance on how to imagine these things coming to fruition.

300 Wishlist Challenge

Here are the instructions for the 300 Wishlist Challenge

  1. Write down everything you want.
  2. Write at least 300 things. At 75, you might get stuck so begin to ask yourself a few questions.
    1. How many cars do you want?
    2. What kind of car?
    3. What color?
    4. Where do you want your next house to be?
    5. Do you want a summer home?
    6. Where do you want to travel to?
    7. How much money do you want in the bank?
    8. How much would you like to have when you retire?
    9. How much would you like to give your siblings?
  3. Read your list every night and every morning.

Visible Vision Board

Here are the instructions for Visible Vision Board:

  1. Take a photo of your vision board, this is your signal to God of what you want Him to do for you.
  2. Save the photo as your phone and computer screen saver to make your vision board visible and easily accessible.

Today, I am asking you to join me for Steve Harvey’s #300wishlist challenge. Grab a notebook and write down everything you are asking God for. Try to get your list done by the New Year, then let’s check in with each other to see what we’ve marked off our list.

You are Accepted: How to Get Accepted into College and Life

Carjie Scott provides a first-hand account of her experience as an administrator serving at trade schools, graduate institutions, and HBCUs. You are Accepted, is required reading for first-generation college students and higher education professionals. It encourages readers to own their story and accept themselves so that they can transform education for individuals who were historically excluded from attending college.

Enter code “Bulk15” to receive 70% off of your order of 5 or more autographed books.

xoNecole: 4 Women on How Mentorship Changed Their Lives.

Mentorship matters. In The Impact of Being a Mentor, by Brittney Oliver founder of Lemons to Lemonade, four women discussed how mentorship has influenced their lives. Each answered four questions:

  1. How is mentorship important to you?
  2. When and why did you first become a mentor?
  3. What has been the biggest reward of mentoring?
  4. How has mentoring changed your life?

On how mentoring changes lives, below are the responses.

Manessa Lormejuste

Mentoring has changed my life as I have been able to connect with many young women who would not have known about a career such as mine. Mentoring has also allowed me to be more confident in myself and stick true to my beliefs. As I continue to pour into my mentees based on my own experiences, I realize that the life I have chosen to pursue was not a mistake, but what I was destined to do.

Manessa Lormejuste, Cosmetic Chemist at L’Oreal USA
Nekasha Pratt

I am a better person and leader because I’m a mentor. My listening and communication skills have improved, and my patience and empathy have increased. I enjoy helping others achieve their goals, so I also have an increased sense of personal pride from seeing a person I mentored succeed.

Nekasha Pratt, Director of Marketing, Tennessee Department of Tourist Development
Carjie Scott

Mentoring has made me a better person, and I think it has made others better. It has increased my relationships with others and allowed me the chance to encourage others to do their very best. It makes me live a purpose-driven life because I know that people are looking up to me. I understand that I can’t give the shirt off my back if I don’t have a shirt on. So, it makes me take care of myself, so I can care for others.

Carjie Scott, Higher Education Administrator
Crystle Johnson

Mentoring has given me a sense of purpose and accomplishment. We don’t have to fly to the moon or cure cancer to be extraordinary. Through empowering, supporting, and sharing with those who need it — we are extraordinary.

Crystle Johnson, Sr. Consultant, Inclusion, Diversity & CSR at Electronic Arts

You are Accepted: How to Get Accepted into College and Life

Carjie Scott provides a first-hand account of her experience as an administrator serving at trade schools, graduate institutions, and HBCUs. You are Accepted, is required reading for first-generation college students and higher education professionals. It encourages readers to own their story and accept themselves so that they can transform education for individuals who were historically excluded from attending college.

Enter code “Bulk15” to receive 70% off of your order of 5 or more autographed books.

7 Ways to be Mindful and Pursue Gratitude

by Carjamin Scott on July 8, 2019 at 9:00 p.m. CST

A number of years ago, I read The Secret by Rhonda Byrne and it completely changed my life. I learned that our thoughts attract what happens in our lives, both good and bad. This notion made me become critical about what I spend time reflecting on. Byrne says, “Your life is in your hands. No matter where you are now, no matter what has happened in your life, you can begin to consciously choose your thoughts, and you can change your life. There is no such thing as a hopeless situation. Every single circumstance of your life can change!” Below are seven ways to be mindful and pursue gratitude.

1. Every morning, spend time reflecting on everything you are grateful for.

Instead of unlocking your phone and checking emails, practice mindfulness. The very first thing you think about will shape the rest of your day. Start with thinking of three things you are truly grateful for, like, your health, family, and career. Then, add to the list every morning.

2. Welcome all of life’s challenges and learn from them.

There is very little you can control in life. In fact, the only thing constant is change and challenges. Embrace it all, learn from it, and teach others. Be grateful for setbacks, roadblocks, and detours. These moments are preparing you for something greater.

3. Assume that others are inherently good and do not want to harm you.

Yes, of course there are people who do not have your best interests at heart. Yes, there are those who want to see you fail. So what! Live your life with courage and never compromise. Treat everyone well even when they don’t deserve it. Life is just so much easier that way.

4. Appreciate the differences in people and find ways to complement those traits.

It’s very easy to be a member of a group where everyone thinks and looks alike. However, it is more fun to take the time to get to know people who are not like you. Discover the strengths of other people, we all have them, then work to highlight those strengths. Be grateful for what others have to offer.

5. Look forward to routine tasks in life by finding ways to make them fun.

Sometimes life can become routine and mundane. Spontaneity makes life more fun. A friend told me about the Waze app. It’s a driving app that alerts you about traffic delays, route shortcuts, and more. You can also text other people using the app on the road with you. On your next road trip, let your passenger use the app on the trip and test all of its functions. It’ll make a routine ride more fun.

6. Create opportunities to give more than you take.

It just feels good to give. Is your co-worker having a baby? Host a diaper shower. Did your friend graduate college? Send a celebratory card. Is someone having a bad day? Give them a hand. Never underestimate the importance of a good deed.

7. Show your appreciation when accepting compliments and credit.

If you are someone who has a hard time receiving compliments, now is the time to begin to change that behavior. Accept the “thank you’s”. When earned, take the credit. Gratefulness includes being grateful for what you do for yourself and for others.

You are Accepted: How to Get Accepted into College and Life

Carjie Scott provides a first-hand account of her experience as an administrator serving at trade schools, graduate institutions, and HBCUs. You are Accepted, is required reading for first-generation college students and higher education professionals. It encourages readers to own their story and accept themselves so that they can transform education for individuals who were historically excluded from attending college.

Enter code “Bulk15” to receive 70% off of your order of 5 or more autographed books.

Six Ways to Celebrate Juneteenth

by Carjamin Scott on June 19, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. CST

Today is Juneteenth, African American Independence Day.  On this day, we celebrate one of the most revolutionary events in our history designed to dismantle the enslavement of Blacks.  In 1865, General Order No. 3 was issued by Unionist Major General Gordon Granger to inform Texans that slaves are no longer the property of their masters. 

Although, the Emancipation Proclamation was issued on January 1, 1893, Texas was exempt from the rule which made June 19, 1865 the official African American Independence Day.  As we celebrate this day, let us recognize where we, as Americans, have come from, how we can keep our history alive, and what we should do moving forward.  Here are six ways to celebrate Juneteenth.

1.Document Juneteenth with an elder or child.

Consider this perspective, Juneteenth happened 156 years ago.  According to the United Nations, our lifespan is 72 years.  This means, that we are only about 3 generations removed from the establishment of Black slavery.  Find a great grandmother or grandfather and ask them what they know about Juneteenth. Talk with your children about the history of Juneteenth.  Document these stories to keep the memories alive.

2.Host a party and register your friends to vote.

Our vote is our voice.  If we want to continue progressing towards freedom for all in America, we will need to be sure our voices are heard.  Host a house or block party, invite your local elected officials, and register your friends to vote. 

3.Attend Juneteenth celebration events.

Here in Nashville, there are many organizations hosting Juneteenth celebration events.  At Fort Negley Park, Mayor David Briley, The Equity Alliance, Kwame Lillard, Gideons Army and others are gathering tonight from 5-8 pm for a Juneteenth celebration hosted by Juneteenth615 and the African American Cultural Alliance.

4.Go to a local school and complete a Juneteenth lesson.

I remember the Emancipation Proclamation history lesson; however, I did not learn about Juneteenth in school. Did you? Contact a principal at your neighborhood school and ask if you can deliver a Juneteenth history lesson. 

5.Volunteer and give money to Black led non-profits.

Nashville has over 100 non-profit organizations working to create opportunities and restore hope for marginalized communities. Which causes are important to you: healthcare, education, fair wages?  Non-profit organizations need money and volunteers like you to further their vision and help to create freedom and equality for all.

6.Patronize Black owned businesses.

Replace your everyday items with Black owned goods. Try and buy new products. Shop at Black owned restaurants and bookstores. If you do not have any businesses in mind, it’ll only take a quick google search to find Black owned businesses in your area.

You are Accepted: How to Get Accepted into College and Life

Carjie Scott provides a first-hand account of her experience as an administrator serving at trade schools, graduate institutions, and HBCUs. You are Accepted, is required reading for first-generation college students and higher education professionals. It encourages readers to own their story and accept themselves so that they can transform education for individuals who were historically excluded from attending college.

Enter code “Bulk15” to receive 70% off of your order of 5 or more autographed books.