Tag: vanderbilt

Briana Perry, State Co-Director at Healthy and Free Tennessee Shares Information about Partnering with College Students.

by Carjamin Scott on July 11, 2018, at 4:57 p.m. CST

Briana Perry is the State Co-Director for Healthy and Free Tennessee. Perry earned a Bachelor of Arts, in Sociology with Honors and a Master of Education in Learning Diversity and Urban Studies from Vanderbilt University.

She has an interest in the well being of Black mothers, ending gender disparity, educating communities in need of sexual and reproductive justice, and partnering with college students.

A native of Memphis, she is making a name for herself as a social justice reformer and inclusive strategist in West Tennessee.

Her career started as a graduate student employee, educating the Vanderbilt community about gender equity and racial justice issues, while working for the Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center at Vanderbilt .

Perry is member of the 2018 New Leaders Council Nashville Chapter, she was a recipient of the Outstanding Professional Promise for M.Ed. in Service to Diverse Populations Award from the Department of Teaching and Learning at Peabody College, and a 2017 Nominee for 120 Under Forty.

She has served on many steering committees for organizations such as the Nashville Feminist Collective, the Children’s Defense Fund Freedom Schools Program, and the East Nashville Hope Exchange.

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Perry believes that colleges should lead in educating students and the community about healthy sexual relationships.

Perry mentioned, “not all states, such as TN, provide adequate sex education (medically accurate and evidence-based) in K-12 schools that is comprehensive and includes consent and healthy relationships.”

This is why Healthy and Free Tennessee is necessary to raise awareness and promote sexual health and reproductive justice.

“Students then enter college lacking this vital information and therefore are not adequately equipped to make informed decisions about their bodies,” said Perry.

Continue reading “Briana Perry, State Co-Director at Healthy and Free Tennessee Shares Information about Partnering with College Students.”
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Meet Rev. Shantell Hinton, the first African American Chaplain at Vanderbilt University

by Carjamin Scott on June 23, 2018, at 10:56 p.m. CST

Just one year ago, Rev. Shantell Hinton, became the African American to lead in the Office of the University Chaplain and Religious Life (OUCRL) at Vanderbilt University. Prior to obtaining the role of Assistant University Chaplain, Assistant Director of Religious Life, she earned a master of divinity from Vanderbilt Divinity School. While enrolled, Hinton was awarded the Kelly Miller Smith Institute for Black Church Studies Certificate and the Florence Conwell Prize.

Hinton has a background in engineering. She earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Vanderbilt and a master’s degree in electrical engineering with a concentration in controls and robotics from Colorado State University. Her career experience includes working as a process control engineer and as a Bible teacher.

Hinton mentioned, “I think God called me to ministry because I had a desire to ask questions and learn how to apply them in church. I started with youth ministry and worked hard to make church relevant for our youth. Later, it evolved into a desire to make the church more relevant for this day and age – to help folks understand God and our faith in different ways.”

Hinton’s religious programmming has provided students with a safe space to explore their faith, an opportunity to celebrate their identities, and develop relationships between student groups who otherwise may not have interacted with each other.

Under her leadership, OUCRL has executed inclusive religious programming particularly for Vanderbilt’s growing students of color population. These programs have provided students with a safe space to explore their faith, an opportunity to celebrate their identity, develop relationships between student groups who otherwise may not have interacted with each other, and have an impactful dialogue about religion and spirituality.

Continue reading “Meet Rev. Shantell Hinton, the first African American Chaplain at Vanderbilt University”

Promote Mental Health Before College: Suicide Risk on the Rise for Teens aged 15-17

by Carjamin Scott on June 11, 2018, at 7:50 p.m. CST

According to a Vanderbilt-led study, the risk of suicide for teens aged 15-17 has increased, particularly during the month of October. The study, published in Pediatrics, indicated that school-aged children had a higher rate of suicide attempts in the fall and spring. The summer months had the lowest rate of suicide attempts.

“To our knowledge, this is one of only a few studies to report higher rates of hospitalization for suicide during the academic school year,” said lead author Greg Plemmons, MD, associate professor of Clinical Pediatrics at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

The study was conducted from 2008-2015 at children’s hospitals across America. The sharp rise of suicides and suicide attempts during the school year suggest that students experience higher levels of stress while enrolled in school. According to the U.S. Center for Disease and Prevention, suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death for adolescents.

…aside from alcohol-related deaths, suicide is the number one cause of death for college students.

Other studies indicate, aside from alcohol-related deaths, suicide is the number one cause of death for college students. As you prepare your student for college this August, be sure to talk with them about the importance of mental health and wellness. Students are often leaving home for the first time. They may experience anxiety, depression, and stress while navigating unfamiliar terrain. If your student is dealing with any of this, suggest that they attend counseling services available at the university. University counselors are experienced with assisting students with navigating college life.

Here are some of the signs to look for to determine if a student you know needs to seek medical treatment.

Continue reading “Promote Mental Health Before College: Suicide Risk on the Rise for Teens aged 15-17”